Wellness CORE Freeze-Dried Raw Treats Review & Giveaway!

Wellness CORE Freeze-Dried Raw Treats Review & Giveaway!

My dog Remy loves the freeze-dried raw treats from Wellness so much that he forgets the most basic commands. He gets so excited that his little brain shuts off!

The Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats are healthy, single-ingredient treats made in the USA with real meat: salmon, boar, beef or turkey. They contain no wheat, corn, soy, artificial flavors or preservatives. Just meat.

This post is sponsored by Wellness Pet Food.

Wellness is giving away a prize pack of food and treats to a reader of That Mutt. Leave a comment at the end of this post for a chance to win!

Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats review

Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats review

What I think of the freeze-dried raw treats from Wellness

My two dogs love these treats. (So much so that Remy can hardly focus on simple tricks! See the video below.) That’s because the treats are made from real meat – turkey, salmon, beef or boar. They contain no corn, soy, wheat, sugar, salt, preservatives or flavorings. Just meat.

The freeze-drying process gently removes the moisture from the treats without removing the nutrients or flavor, according to Wellness.

They make a great training treat because they are not greasy and can easily be stuffed in your pocket. They are small treats and can also break easily.

What is the cost?

The freeze-dried treats from Wellness CORE are affordable.

The cost through Chewy.com is about $6.99 per 2-ounce bag. ORDER HERE.

Choose from boar, salmon, beef or turkey.

Wellness CORE products are also available through other retailers such as PetSmart.

Pros of the Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats:

  • healthy
  • made with high-quality meat
  • made in the USA
  • single-ingredient treats
  • no corn, sugar, wheat, salt, gluten, etc. (just meat!)
  • not greasy
  • 2 calories per treat
  • easy way to introduce raw food to your dog’s diet
  • high in protein

I recommend the Wellness CORE treats if you’re feeding your dog a raw diet or if you would like to upgrade your dog’s food and treats to a healthier option. They’re also a good choice if your dog has allergies because they are one ingredient. These are also a good training treat.

Order the treats from Chewy.com here.

Ace with Wellness CORE RawRev food and treats

Cons:

  • can break easily in delivery
  • the salmon flavor is smelly (which dogs love!)
  • ideally you should wash your hands after handling since they’re raw

These treats might not be for your dog if you’re looking for larger, biscuit-type treats. These are small treats, good for training or topping their food.

Wellness CORE freeze dried raw treats

Other Wellness CORE products

Wellness CORE makes several different types of grain-free food and treats for dogs. You can learn more about all of their products on their website here.

The company sent my dogs a bag of their CORE RawRev food. This is a grain-free dry food combined with freeze-dried pieces of raw meat.

I recommend a raw diet for most dogs but if a raw diet is not for you, Wellness CORE RawRev is an excellent choice. It’s not a 100% raw diet, but dogs love the pieces of raw meat mixed with their dry food. Read my full review of RawRev here.

(Wellness CORE also makes canned food and a dry food without raw meat. Learn more on their website here.)

Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats review

Giveaway – win 2 bags of food and treats for your dog from Wellness CORE

Wellness is giving away a prize pack of food and treats to a reader of That Mutt.

To enter: Just leave a comment below. Let me know why your dog is interested in new treats!

I’ll pick a winner at random on Tuesday Feb 27. The winner will be notified by email first and then listed here on this post.

The winner will receive:

  • Two 4-pound bag of Wellness CORE RawRev dog food
  • Two 2-ounce bags of Wellness CORE freeze-dried raw treats

Must have a U.S. mailing address to win.

Is your dog interested in these goodies? Let me know in the comments.

That Mutt’s $5/mo and $7/mo Patreon members receive automatic entries into all the blog’s giveaways, including this one. We still have 5 spots remaining at our $7/mo level. Join us here.

*Get notified of future giveaways from That Mutt. Click Here.

Related posts:

Wellness CORE review

Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats Review & Giveaway

Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats Review & Giveaway

I want to let you know about the high-quality, single-ingredient dog treats from Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats.

Dr. Dalton’s treats are made from dried raw chicken, beef or pork, and the company says its treats are sourced, produced and packaged in the United States.

My dogs went nuts over Dr. Dalton’s treats, and I’m sure your dogs will love them too.

This post is sponsored by Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats.

Use code thatmutt10 for 10% off your first order. Click here. We also have a giveaway going on. Leave a comment at the end of this post for a chance to win a free bag of treats (2 winners).

Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats review

My dog Ace with Dr. Dalton's Treats

What I think of Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats

My two dogs love these snacks, and I don’t have to worry about the ingredients because these are single-ingredient treats made from real meat. They contain no salt, coloring, sugar, sweeteners, gluten, grain, chemicals or preservatives. Just meat.

Another nice thing about Dr. Dalton’s treats is they are designed by a dog trainer for dog training (more on that below). The treats are not greasy so I can keep them directly in my pocket on walks or at training classes. They also break easily into smaller pieces.

Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats are available in “simply beef,” “simply chicken” or the “meat medley” which contains chicken, beef and pork.

The treats are small and crunchy, about 1.5” in length.

Remy my weimaraner with Dr. Dalton's Treats

What is the cost? Plus a coupon code!

On Dr. Dalton’s website, the treats are $14.99 for a 3-ounce bag or $28.99 for a 6-ounce bag.

You can use code thatmutt10 on your first order for 10% off. (Not valid on subscription orders.)

Of course, higher-quality treats are going to cost more than average. The treats from Dr. Dalton’s do not contain excess water since they have been dried. Therefore, each 3-ounce bag has about 45-50 treats and will last you quite a while.

The company says it uses only high-grade, quality muscle meat, and because excess water is removed and no fillers are added, there is no need for Dr. Dalton’s to add preservatives, binders, flavorings, colorings, etc. The final product is 80% crude protein, according to the package.

Order the treats here use code thatmutt10

More about Dr. Susan Dalton

Dr. Susan Dalton is a certified professional dog trainer who uses positive reinforcement training methods. Her business, California School for Dogs, offers both group classes and private lessons. Her website says she has trained hundreds of dogs and specializes in helping dogs with fear and aggression.

Treats are obviously a big component in Dr. Dalton’s training program, so she started making her own treats in 2012 using simple, clean ingredients, according to her website. It was her training clients who actually convinced her to make the treats available for purchase.

Pros of Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats

  • Made with real, high-quality meat
  • 80% crude protein (according to package), 8% crude fat, just 5% moisture
  • No salt, sugar, gluten, chemicals, coloring, etc. (just meat!)
  • Made, sourced and packaged in USA
  • Non-greasy
  • Free shipping on orders of 2 or more
  • Breaks easily to smaller pieces for training

I recommend Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats for training because they are not greasy and you can keep them directly in your pocket. They are also a good choice if you are a raw feeder or are looking to feed your dog a higher-quality treat for training, snacks, etc.

Order the treats here – use code thatmutt10 for 10% off

My Lab mix Ace with Dr. Dalton's Premium Treats

Cons:

  • Cost is a bit higher (but good quality of course)
  • You could make similar treats yourself by dehydrating meat

These might not be for you if they’re out of your budget or if you prefer to make dehydrated treats yourself.

Giveaway – Win a bag of Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats for your dog

Dr. Dalton’s is giving away a 3-ounce bag of treats to two winners.

To enter, all you have to do is leave a comment below so I know you want in on the drawing. Must have a U.S. mailing address to win.

Let me know why your dog needs a bag of treats!

My weimaraner Remy with Dr. Dalton's Premium Treats

I’ll choose two winners at random on Tues Feb 13. I’ll announce them here on this post and notify the winners by email. The winners can choose between chicken, beef or the meat medley.

Are you interested in a healthier treat option for your dog?

Let me know in the comments, and please share this post with anyone who might be interested in Dr. Dalton’s Premium Treats.

That Mutt’s $5 and $7/month Patreon member get free entries into all the blog’s giveaways, including this one. We still have 4 spots available. Click here.

Related posts:

How to make dehydrated treats for dogs

Two DIY raw dog food recipes

Homemade raw dog food recipes

Why Is My Dog So Hard to Train? #ThisIsMyDog

Why Is My Dog So Hard to Train? #ThisIsMyDog

Training a dog is hard work and we all make mistakes. Reading online, you might think most people’s dogs are perfect. Trust me, they’re not! Here is a story about MY real dog…

Our five dogs wait in a down/stay. We’ve done this dozens of times, maybe hundreds.

The class instructor tells us to drop the leashes and walk away.

“Keep going,” he says. “Past the tent. Go all the way to the fence.”

The fence is about 100 yards from our dogs. This is the first time we’ve tested them at this distance, and it takes us a few minutes to get there. The goal, of course, is for our dogs to remain in place, to stay until we return. They stare at us, attentive.

Until I glance up and see a blur of gray muscle charging towards me. For a moment, I don’t recognize him. That couldn’t be my dog.

It is.

Not only is Remy running full speed across the field, but instead of running to me he darts to my left. He wants to keep going! I can see he’s proud of himself. He’s got that goofy weim grin. A free spirit.

I snag the leash.

He hits the end hard. My rugby skills come in handy as a weim owner, turns out.

My dog and I walk across the field, a walk of shame, back to the original position where four dogs still wait. They gaze out at their owners in adoration.

I put Remy in place. I tell him “stay” but this time I only walk about 8 feet. I wait for the other dog owners so we can all return and praise our dogs together. I tell my dog he’s a good boy for staying. I know we have work to do.

Now … I write this to show you one thing – dogs are not perfect. They’re dogs! And people are not perfect. Remy was not ready for that kind of challenge, clearly, and that’s OK. I learned from it.

Dog training is a lot of work. It takes time, patience and more time. I never want anyone to feel bad because their dog is having trouble with leash manners or coming when called or whatever it might be. We all have our own struggles.

The problems I have with Remy usually come down to the fact that he’s higher energy than almost all dogs. He brings “easily excitable” to a whole new level and on top of that he likes to have the last word. If Remy doesn’t want to do something, he nips or mumbles and grumbles. He’s got “personality.” I love him.

“How old is he?” people ask. They see this wiggly body and big, Dumbo ears.

“He’s 2.”

Them: “Wow! He acts like a puppy!”

But the thing is … Remy IS still a puppy. Weimaraners and plenty of other breeds are slow to mature. They’re puppies until at least 2.

A lot of 6-month-old puppies act more mature than my weim, especially smaller breeds. That’s just the way it is.

So I thought we could all share some stories of our REAL dogs. The good, the bad, the funny. Dogs are dogs! Training and raising them is an adventure, a work in progress.

Let me know your stories below or post them on Instagram or Twitter with hashtag #ThisIsMyDog and #ThatMutt

I’ll share some of your examples in a post next week.

Here are two more of my stories …

So my dog starts heaving in the living room. Like, this dog is gonna upchuck, big time!

I run forward to guide him off the rug. Only, this triggers a primal possessiveness in my dog. He holds in his puke, dashes to the corner and stands there like a demon. Hackles up. He’s holding his puke in his mouth, gagging, trying to guard it from me.

You can keep your puke, Remy. I’ll pick my battles.

#ThisIsMyDog

Or, when I pick him up from “doggy daycare” and he’s so hyper the staff can’t get his Gentle Leader or prong collar on him.

They bring him out on a slip lead. He’s hopping on his hind legs, little front arms hanging like a T-Rex, eyes bugged out.

“He’s really sweet,” they tell me.

Uh-huh.

This is my life.

#ThisIsMyDog

Now it’s your turn!

Let me know a story about your REAL dog in the comments below. The good, the bad, the funny. Or post to Twitter or Instagram with hashtag #ThisIsMyDog and #ThatMutt

We want people to know that training a dog is hard work and we all make mistakes. Reading blogs and Instagram posts, you might think people’s dogs are perfect. Trust me, they’re not!

In the comments below, tell me about your dog!

Review: Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes – Paracord Dog Leashes

Review: Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes – Paracord Dog Leashes

Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes is a company that makes beautiful hand-tied dog leashes and collars from USA-made paracord.

The company sent each of my dogs a leash. I chose an 8-foot orange “float leash” and a 6-foot double-braid leash in black.

This post is sponsored by Salty’s Own. You can use code MUTT10 for 10% off all products. Click here. We’re also offering a giveaway. One reader of That Mutt will receive a free leash of his or her choice. Leave a comment at the end of this post to enter.

Review of Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes

My dog Ace with his paracord leash

What I think of the leashes from Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes

I’m really impressed with the leashes from Salty’s Own. They are beautiful, durable and comfortable, and I highly recommend them. The paracord is extra soft on my hands, and these leashes are high quality.

Elizabeth Strazzulla (pictured) is the owner of Salty’s Own, and she tells the story behind her company on her website:

“Long ago, my great uncle made knot leashes while serving in the U.S. Coast Guard. As a young girl, I found these both beautiful and fascinating. How could such lovely patterns be created out of rope? Now years later, my own daughter has become interested in nautical knots and animals, so we decided to revive this craft in our family. I hope you and your animals enjoy these leashes!”

Salty's Own

Salty’s Own leashes are made using 100% USA-made paracord. Each strand is strength tested to 550 lbs, and the leashes are hand tied by Elizabeth and her daughter in Newburyport, Mass. The solid brass hardware is marine grade and corrosion resistant.

I like how Salty’s Own also gives you a lot of flexibility on the colors, lengths and styles you want.

The leashes I chose are the standard 6-foot double braid leash in black and an 8-foot “float leash” in orange.

Our 6-foot leash came with a traffic lead loop which I think is helpful when walking a dog.

Braided paracord dog leashes from Salty's Own Nautical Leashes

The float leashes (below) are designed to float when your dog goes swimming. They’re made from floating marine safety line, according to Salty’s. The handle and clip ends are secured with reflective military grade paracord. And, according to the company, these leashes are “strong enough to hold a boat!”

Float leash from Salty's Own Nautical Leashes

The only downside that I could think of with these leashes is the paracord is naturally a bit stretchy. So while the material is very comfortable on my hands, it also gives strong pullers like Remy a little extra “give.” On the other hand, you can also use that slight stretchiness to your advantage because it absorbs a bit of the “shock” when a dog pulls. And these leashes are seriously very durable!

What is the cost of a leash?

Use code MUTT10 for 10% off all products. Click here.

Most of the 6-foot leashes are about $39.99 but the price ranges a bit due to the different lengths.

Smaller lengths for small dogs and puppies are usually about $28.

Pros of Salty’s Own leashes:

  • Small, family-owned company in Massachusetts
  • Mother/daughter team
  • Excellent quality – these leashes are “strong enough to hold a boat!”
  • Made with USA paracord and hand tied
  • Comfortable on your hands
  • Huge variety of color options
  • Smaller sizes available for small dogs and puppies
  • $1 shipping in USA

I recommend these paracord dog leashes if you’re looking for a good-quality 6-foot leash that will last several years. There are also unlimited color options, and it’s nice to know the leashes are hand tied!

Order a leash here – Use MUTT10 at checkout for 10% off

My dog Ace with his float leash from Salty's Own Nautical Leashes

Cons of the paracord dog leashes:

  • These paracord dog leashes stretch a bit, not quite like a bungee but there is some “give”
  • So smooth on your hands that it’s hard to get a good grip for extra strong “pullers”
  • I know $40 seems like a lot for a leash but the quality is worth it

These paracord dog leashes might not be best for you if your dog tends to lunge or jump at other dogs due to the way the leash stretches a bit. However, you can request your leash to come with a traffic lead loop for extra control (see the example below). I highly recommend that option.

Salty's Own Nautical Leashes

Giveaway information – Win a free leash for your dog

Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes is giving away a free leash to a reader of That Mutt. (Update: The giveaway has ended.)

To enter:

Just leave a comment below so I know your dog wants IN on the drawing. Let me know why you’re interested in a new leash.

I’ll choose a winner at random on Tuesday Feb. 6. I’ll notify the winner by email and will post here as well. Update: Congrats to Ken S.!

Salty's Own Nautical paracord leashes

Is your dog interested in a paracord leash from Salty’s Own Nautical Leashes?

Let me know in the comments.

Please share this post with anyone who might be interested in paracord dog leashes.

-Lindsay

Related posts:

How to stop your dog from pulling on the leash

What to do when your dog bites or shakes the leash

 

Because of Dogs, My Heart Will Grow

Because of Dogs, My Heart Will Grow

When the dog you love is getting old

There’s something I’m sure of and it’s both heartbreaking and exciting: I can’t fully love my young dog until my senior dog has died.

It’s not because I can’t bond with two dogs (or seven dogs). It’s because I give so much of my time, heart and dedication to each dog.

Ace is doing well considering I thought he was going to die two years ago.

He sleeps all the time, but he walks with me slowly for 20 mins each day. He eats all his meals. He seems to enjoy our trips to the park. He rests in the grass while I watch over him.

But the inevitable is my Lab mix is almost 12 and that’s old for a big lug like Ace. He’s ancient.

It will be nice to acknowledge his 12th birthday (March 1). We have a few trips planned and a big move. I always hope Ace will be here to enjoy life’s changes; I hardly know what I’ll do when he’s not.

But with the passing of one dog, another chapter will open.

Remy and I will focus more on training, agility, going for even longer runs. I can’t wait to take him on epic backpacking trips. I can’t wait to see our potential.

I will eventually foster dogs again. Get ready, Josh. It won’t be anywhere near as easy as it was fostering dogs with Ace (Remy is a spaz!). But there are dogs who need our help and we can provide routine, exercise, safety.

I’m interested in fostering bird dogs (because I’m nuts). And I want to help our country’s most forgotten dogs – the strays across our Indian reservations.

And someday, I’m not sure when, we’ll of course be getting another dog of our own. I have a feeling that dog will be extra special. My heart will be larger because of Ace. Maybe that dog will be our next mutt. Or, who knows, another weim.

But that won’t be for a long time.

I need to focus on the young dog in front of me. And today, my old dog.

For months, I felt guilty that Remy took attention from my best buddy.

Now I see a shift. I see that Remy can’t reach his potential while my heart remains so guarded.

Don’t get me wrong, both dogs are pampered, spoiled Mamma’s boys. I spend all day with them!

But Ace takes up so much love in my heart, there’s hardly room left for Remy.

There’s an essay by Will K. from the blog “Marking Our Territory” that I want to share with you.

It’s called “The Dog I loved the Least.”

Will’s situation is not the same as mine; his dog lost the chance to grow old. But it’s the closest words to what I’m trying to say:

From “The Dog I loved the Least”:

“The alternative is to love yesterday more than today. Love memory more than experience. Love the world less after having shared all those life changing moments with Eko. …

“The easy truth is that I loved my puppy with every fiber of my being. The hard truth is that the greatest honor I can give Eko is to remember him as the dog I loved the least. That his life transformed me into a person with an ever increasing capacity for love, no matter the cost.” [Read the full essay here.]

I understand how someone could have 5 or 6 dogs and properly care for them all.

I understand how someone could have no dogs, to avoid the inevitable heartbreak.

For me, I loved dogs before I knew Ace and I will love dogs after Ace.

But Ace has opened my world to blogging, dog adoption, fostering, agility, running with dogs, backpacking, starting a business, leading me to friends I never would’ve met. You know who you are.

Today, I will appreciate every moment with my boy.

Because of Ace, because of all dogs, my heart will grow.

In the comments, let me know about your special dog.

And what did you think of the essay, ‘The Dog I Loved the Least’?

Read it and then come back and let me know!

Other writing I want to share:

Ocean-going Labs

NY Times Essay “The Wrong Dog”

Essay: Winter camping with my dog – a break

Essay: “Disconnected”

 

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