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Homemade Raw Dog Food Recipes

Homemade Raw Dog Food Recipes

Homemade raw dog food recipes

In this post I share my own experience learning to feed my dog a raw dog food diet.

I have been feeding my dogs a raw dog food diet since 2011. We started with a pre-made, frozen commercial brand and eventually I started making homemade raw food to save some money (hence, the recipes in this post and in my ebook).

The main downside to feeding commercial raw dog food is the price. Ace is a 67-pound black lab mix. (2019 update: Ace has passed away.)

A 6-pound bag of commercial raw food is roughly $27 (on the low end) and will last my dog just four days. It costs more than $200 a month to feed him commercial raw.

Most of us do not have $200 in our monthly budgets for dog food. That’s the equivalent or more of feeding an extra person, which is why it makes sense to consider homemade raw food at least a couple days per week or to mix in with a commercial raw brand.

If you decide to buy ingredients to make the food yourself, you’ll be buying foods like raw beef or raw chicken, raw organs like chicken livers, raw bones and raw veggies.

You can buy most of these ingredients at your local grocery store or butcher. Look for meat that is higher in fat. This meat is cheaper and considered lower-quality meat for humans, but most dogs need the extra fat in their diets.

You can likely save even more if you know any local ranchers, farmers or hunters. Deer meat and guts are perfect for dogs!

The added benefit of buying your own raw dog food ingredients is that you will know exactly what your dog is eating.

The drawback, of course, is time and making sure the meals are generally balanced.

To help you out, I’ve written an ebook to guide you through the process of learning to feed a raw diet.

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Raw dog food Ebook

How much raw dog food should I feed my dog?

The general rule is to feed your dog 2 percent of his body weight. This is just a general rule. Some dogs will only require 1 percent while others may need 3 or 4 percent.

Here’s a simple equation you can use to find out how much to feed your dog in ounces:

Your dog’s weight in pounds x 16 = your dog’s weight in ounces. (For example, my dog weighs 67 pounds X 16 = 1,072 ounces.)

Your dog’s weight in ounces x .02 = roughly the amount of food your dog should eat in ounces per day. (So with my dog it is 1,072 x .02 = 21.44.)

According to the above example, my 67 pound dog should be eating 21.44 ounces of food per day, or 1.3 pounds (16 ounces in 1 pound).

Homemade raw dog food recipes

I feed him a bit more (24 ounces per day) since he is naturally lean and burns a lot of calories. You also want to factor in the treats you feed your dog. Ace barely gets any treats because I am a mean dog mom.

It doesn’t have to be complicated! If your dog is underweight, feed him a bit more. If he’s fat, feed him less.

Free homemade raw dog food recipes

*My ebook has 10 additional recipes. Download the ebook with the button below.

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For this post, I also asked some readers and friends to share some of their homemade raw dog food recipes.

The raw dog food recipes in this post are not necessarily 100 percent balanced or meant to be fed every day. They are not necessarily recommended by a veterinarian. They are not necessarily right for your particular dog.

These are just some real examples of real raw meals real dog owners have fed their dogs.

If you feed your dog raw, please share some examples of meals you feed your dog. It would be extra helpful if you could also tell us the weight, breed and activity level of your dog and where you buy the ingredients.

DIY homemade raw dog food recipes - Easy raw dog food recipes #rawdogfood #rawfed #rawfeeding #rawdogfoodcommunity #rawdogfoodrecipes

Raw meat/veggie mix

This is for a 100-pound Kuvasz, twice per day:

  • 1/4 C. plain yogurt
  • 1/4 -1/2 C. chopped or ground veggies (carrots, leafy greens, apples, broccoli or peas)
  • A skinned chicken leg quarter with bone (chicken leg, thigh and some of the back, which usually weighs about 1 lb)

If the meat does not have a lot of bone, sometimes Biggie’s owners will add a calcium tablet.

Raw beef/organ/veggie mix

This is for an active springer/pointer mix:

  • 2 C. raw ground beef or chicken (from local meat shop)
  • 1 C. organ meat (from grocery store)
  • 1 C. vegetables/fruit

Rotate the kinds of organ meat and veggies you use. Blend the organ meat and veggies and mix with the already ground meat. Add an egg if desired.

Raw beef stuffed in Kongs

This method is intended to keep the dogs (a standard poodle and a pitbull) occupied while their owner goes to work. It’s as easy as it sounds. Simply stuff several Kong toys with raw meat. Then freeze and serve.

In this case, each dog gets 2 to 3 frozen Kongs per day. The Kongs are typically filled with raw ground beef from Hare Today, a farm located in Pennsylvania that grinds, cuts and packages whole animals.

Pumpkin paws

  • Small amount of any raw meat (optional)
  • Small amount of spinach, chopped carrots or broccoli (optional)
  • 2 C. water
  • 1 large can of pumpkin puree (not pie filling)
  • 1 small can of tomato puree
  • 9-ounce paper cups

If using meat, make sure it is finely chopped or ground. Otherwise, put it in a food processor with the water to make a soup. Mix all ingredients in a bowl until well blended. Put a very generous tablespoon in each paper cup. Freeze and serve. You probably want to serve outside!

Some reminders about feeding homemade raw dog food recipes:

  • Some fruits and vegetables are not good for dogs such as grapes and onions.
  • Never give your dog cooked bones or sharp raw bones.

If you are going to make your dog’s raw food yourself, I highly recommend making at least a week’s worth at a time and storing it in your freezer.

Update on feeding my dog raw food

All the above recipes sound easy, right? I think so. It’s just a matter of buying the food ahead of time and planning ahead.

To make it easier, you can always feed one meal of DIY raw dog food and one meal of commercial raw dog food each day.

Gradual switch to raw or quick switch?

Back when I first introduced Ace to raw dog food, I gradually switched him from dry food to raw dog food by mixing the two together over eight days.

Ace the black lab/hound mix out for a walk. He loves his homemade raw dog food recipes

This is what the majority of vets and raw dog food companies recommend, but some people just switch over “cold turkey” and it goes just fine.

See my post: How to transition your dog to a raw diet.

Friends and family who are skeptical of raw dog food

This is just a small annoyance, but there are people who are obviously opposed to Ace eating raw food. I have to just brush their opinions aside and worry about myself. I wanted to mention this because it’s something you will likely come across if you switch your dog to a raw diet.

I don’t waste time trying to explain the diet to certain friends and family members. I know what’s best for my dog. They can feed their dogs what they want.

Here is what I noticed after switching Ace to a homemade raw diet:

Ear infections

Ace used to get about two ear infections a year so not enough where I was overly concerned about food allergies or environmental allergies. Since being on a raw diet he’s had one ear infection in about six years.

Itchy skin/dandruff

Ace seems to scratch a lot less and lick his paws less when on a raw diet.

Teeth

I don’t expect to notice a difference in Ace’s teeth, but many others report their dogs oral health improved dramatically after switching to raw.

Shedding

There is a LOT less shedding.

Less poop!

I know this is more information than you want to hear, but Ace’s poop is tiny and hard – just what I like to see!

Energy

My dog definitely has less energy every year, and while others report a raw diet seems to give their dogs more energy, that has never been noticeable with my low-energy guy. He’s just low energy all the time!

Learn more about raw feeding with my ebook10 Easy Raw Dog Food Recipes.”

Ebook on raw feeding by Lindsay Stordahl

ORDER NOW

Do you feed your dog homemade raw food?

In the comments, share some examples of raw dog food “recipes” you have used.

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Triane Clowers

Saturday 26th of October 2019

Hi My Name is Triane My daughter and I adopted pittbull terrier in August so right now we are feeding Bella raw food beef and sweet potatoes and mix it with grain free food. I'm not sure if that's a good for her. So that's why I have decided to start making her raw food and also continue too mix it with her dry food. Help we love our Bella!! Thanks!

Jennifer

Sunday 14th of April 2019

Loved reading your article. Even though it is based on your own science and beliefs, I thoroughly enjoyed reading how everything you do is for the benefit of your dogs. Everyone will never agree on the same things, scientifically tested or not. No dog is the same, nor are the needs of everything individual dog. I have 2 boxers, who for those that don’t know; are prone to allergies, cancer, hip and joint issues, Head tremors, you name it a boxer is prone to it. I’ve been feeding my two raw for 3 1/2 years, they will be 4 next week. Not only do they devour their meals, their overall health thus far is astronomical. Thanks for sharing your opinions and I wish the world would be more open minded about something a lot of people are ignorant to.

aj

Monday 22nd of October 2018

Thanks this article was helpful and practical. I especially appreciated seeing how to calculate an amount to start my dog on.

Anyone have recipe recommendations for smaller dogs? I have a chihuahua mix and we are looking into if he is having liver or digestive issues. Also, How do you know what to include nutrition wise when making a recipe for your dog?

Sandy

Wednesday 4th of July 2018

I have a 12 year old long haired miniature Daschund. I used to feed him a high quality dry dog food with a little canned food with water to make a gravy. Every couple of weeks he’d have an off day...his stomach would be gurgling, he wouldn’t eat, and he’d lay around all day. He shed like crazy, his skin was dry and flakey, his paws were dry and rough and he had terrible teeth. But, weirdly, he was a happy dog! And the Vet said he was healthy! I happened to see a recipe for raw dog food on Pinterest and I delved into the world of homemade dog food with a passion. Duncan has been on raw food for a little over a year now. No off days. Skin is no longer dry and flakey, his paws are smooth, his ears never get gunk in them and he has started chewing again. He used to be a great chewer but slowly stopped due to bad teeth. I give him chicken bones and beef soup bones. The soup bones are big and he works on them for several days. I wondered if I should be giving him grains but after some research, I know he’s fine without them. He gets chicken or beef, livers, hearts, gizzards, eggs with the shells, veggies. I give him Omega 3 oil and a supplement for his joints (for the back issues these dogs sometimes develop and he likes to jump!) His goodies consist of carrots, apples mainly. He still looks like a young dog. And doesn’t sleep as much as most male Daschunds after the age of 2. To all the people that are a little freaked about what to include in their dog’s diet....all I have to say is that many of us fed our dogs the exact same thing every day for years! Start simple. Experiment a little. Read a lot. Watch your dog.

Jo Archer

Saturday 24th of February 2018

My scottie has skin problems. I have given her chicken a lot, and chicken necks for calcium. I decided to take her off of all chicken, even eggs.

My butcher gave me bonemeal from his shop made when they saw meat with bones. He told me to be careful not to give my dog too much at a time because it is so rich that too much could cause diarrhea. Chicken necks have a lot of fat on them, so I’m wondering if the bone meal with meat, bones, bone marrow, and fat is richer than chicken necks. I gave her about a tablespoon of the marrow last night with about a third cup of ground turkey. What do you think?